Category Archives: Journalism

Metallica – Garage Days Revisited CD Review – Remastered, 2018

As you watch the video above, in which James Hetfield speaks about a guitar made from the wood of a garage, you get the feeling Metallica have left the outer orbits of this planet a long time ago.  For Hetfield to speak about taking some wooden planks and hiring an artist to then sculpt and mold him a new guitar it’s something of a Spinal Tap moment; the truly sad thing is that I’m not sure anybody in the Metallica camp actually see it this way.

Rewind to 1987, and Metallica had lost their bassist Cliff Burton, who died the previous September whilst the band were in the midst of a European Tour. Eager to use their music as a way to funnel, and possibly even challenge, their grief; the band decided to record an extended play of 70’s Punk and Hardcore covers. They rehearsed in Lars Ulrich’s converted garage in El Cerrito, California (which was soundproofed by new bassist, Jason Newsted, who used this experience to record his first material with the group)

Another reason for this EP was due to the lack of new material being produced, mostly as songwriting sessions with the new bassist had only produced a demo of the song ‘Blackened’ and vocalist James Hetfield would also break his arm during a skateboarding accident; quite possibly the last time Hetfield would ever go skateboarding. Remastered and (somewhat) produced, the EP sees its re-release in 1987, on a number of different formats including Vinyl, CD, Longbox Format and even Cassette.

The packaging for the album still proudly displays that it is the $5.98 EP and with inflation in the proceeding 31 years I’m almost positive that the change rate with GBP means I paid a little higher. That said, I bought the special longbox edition, with lenticular photo,  which looks incredible. Inside you’ve got the actual CD with mini Vinyl type layout. Another nice touch. Having seen the cassette too I’m really impressed with how the band opted to recreate the original colors and design and mimicked the authentic article as much as possible.

The tracks present have all been polished and refined and sound fantastic, with ‘Last Caress’ being my own favorite.  I’m also quite partial to ‘Crash Course in Brain Surgery’ which would go on to inspire a number of themed shirts and designs from Pushead across the next few decades, even though the song was originally recorded by British NWOBHM band Budgie in 1974. Axl Rose once referred to Guns N’ Roses ‘Spaghetti Incident’ as the ‘Pension Incident’ because of the amount of songwriters they were helping pay alimony, leading you to wonder whether Metallica have helped a few people out with these covers across the years.

While rehearsing “White Lightning” by New wave of British heavy metal band Paralex, Kirk Hammett instead started playing “The Wait” by post-punk group Killing Joke, making Metallica choose that song. Other tracks considered but dropped included “Signal Fire” by Japanese band Bow Wow, and another NWOBHM song, Gaskin’s “I’m No Fool”.

This EP is short and sweet, even if both ‘Helpless’ and ‘The Small Hours’ are bordering on six and a half minutes apiece. I’d recommend, especially with Spotify prevalent in all our lives, that this one might just be for collectors.  And if you want my advice; you’d be best positioned to go for the longbox or cassette to get a truly unique piece of Metallica history (albeit reproduced) that might just become as sought after as the original.

Nostaglic TV Theme Tunes That Survived The 80s!

There is nothing, literally nothing, like a good TV theme. There was a time when TV shows prided themselves on the production of a catchy “lyric” or “jingle” to announce with pride that this was another installment of your favorite weekly programme.

Of course, that was before corporate greed set in €“ you’re now lucky if you get the credits of the production team involved before the first ad break has arrived. This was a golden age, when families gathered around the television on a weekly basis, long before iPlayers and Netflix made it virtually impossible to miss your favorite television.

You had one chance, maybe two if you were very lucky, to catch the stories and the events of the week before they were simply over and done with until the same time, same channel, next week.

In this list we pay tribute to a series of TV themes which, quite literally, rocked our world and are now just distant memories. They stood for the announcement that it was time to see another episode of your favorite show and, years later, still play in our head upon command. They’re the kind of tune you can bring up on YouTube, play at full volume and just feel all magical about, remembering a simple time when everyone sat around and watched that favorite programme on an evening and nobody just put their headphones in and used a laptop instead. Let’s see what’s on…

Going For Gold (1987)

Yet to be recognized by the IOC as an official participatory event, many of us old enough to remember classic daytime television will no doubt be delighted by the addition of this, a true programme of Olympic magnitude to the list.

With a theme composed by Hans Zimmer (bet you didn’t know that) ‘Going for Gold’ was originally aired by the BBC between 1987 and 1996. It’s premise of 7 English speaking contestants, each representing their respective regions, allowed for a battle of both nationalistic pride and fierce loyalty. Since you could only have someone totally neutral present such a programme, the host was none other than Irishman Henry Kelly, who (for my money) was the finest Irishman to present on BBC programming since the late Terry Wogan. But that’s just my nationalistic pride showing.

The theme itself is a very simple and completely dated retro ‘pop’ song which doesn’t do much except describe the situation. But it’s catchy, it’s 80’s and it’s got a quality about it that makes you want to define nostalgia. I defy you to take a listen and not find it the catchiest thing you’ve listed too all day – before you’ve heard what else we have coming up, of course!

Blockbusters (1983)

Are you surprised? Seriously? If you’re looking at this and DON’T know the Blockbuster’s theme tune then I’m sorry to say it’s been a deprived life you’ve led. However, I am extremely pleased to be the person with the honor of introducing you to one of the finest theme tunes you’re ever likely to hear.

I’m really not sure whether the UK video chain Blockbusters named their franchise after this show (the first Blockbuster LLC stores opened in Texas in 1985 so that’s probably not very likely) but regardless this was an insanely popular show that quite literally brought families together. Hosted by veteran actor the late Bob Holness (the first man to play James Bond, don’t you know) this show usually pitted two individuals against a single opponent in a quiz show €“ not unlike tic tac toe €“ where the objective was for players to cross the board with right answers.


But you don’t really care about the rules, not with such classic moments as “I’d like a P please Bob” and the fact that the BBC Proms once played this theme tune live on television at the Royal Albert Hall! Blockbusters was relaunched by Challenge after somewhat of a hiatus, with Simon Mayo as presenter, although it failed (at time of writing) to have more than a single season. I’m only mentioning it because you might like to know I auditioned personally to be on the programme, thus attempting to fulfill a lifetime ambition, but was sorely unsuccessful in gaining a spot. I’m not saying that’s why the programme didn’t catch on, but let’s face it, can’t have helped them.

Baywatch (1989)

 OK guys, and curious girls, this is obviously a big deal. Who couldn’t have been swayed by the sight of Pamela Anderson, Yasmine Bleeth, Donna D’ Errico, Traci Bingham, Nancy Valen and Gena Lee Nolin running across that beach to save the injured? You have to imagine that David Hasselhoff, quite literally, got the best job in the world the day he was cast in Baywatch. But all of that pales in comparison to the theme.

Baywatch only officially picked “I’ll Be Ready” as their official theme from the start of the third season, despite the popular belief it was the only theme tune the show ever had, sung by none other than Jimi “Eye of the Tiger” Jamison from the band Survivor.

The studio version of Jimi’s song features on the 1999 album Empires, though sadly that wasn’t as well received, I’ve always found the most magical part of the song is the keyboard solo €“ and if you believe this is just a classic case of the Americans doing it bigger and better than anywhere else, you’d probably be right.

The lyrics are inspiring and evoke a sense of just wanting to go out and save someone €“ to be honest I think US army recruitment officers should just play this track outside their offices and throughout their barracks and that would be the only inspiration you’d ever need. Then I guess David was upset that they never asked to use ‘Freedom’ either….

Brookside (1982)

 The Liverpudlian soap Brookside first appeared on our screens in 1982, bringing us the trials and tribulations of the long suffering residents of Brookside Close, a typical middle class cul-de-sac filled with rather foul mouthed and obnoxious people eager to kick off at the slightest agitation.

Launched before Eastenders (which itself first aired in 1985) to create a more “working class” answer to Coronation Street, it was an atypical 80s soap and it’s theme (obviously very synthesized and written by composers Steve Wright and Dave Roylance) reflected the nature of it’s beginnings. Even when it changed in 1991 to reflect a more ‘modern’ sound it still held that classic tone and hadn’t axed anything the fans knew or loved about it.

While Brookside gained a massive following throughout the late 80’s and early 90’s (with that infamous pre-lesbian watershed kiss in 1994, the incestuous relationship of 96 and the idea of a man selling drugs to children) it was thought the soap would be a main contender against the likes of it’s more big budgeted rivals. Unfortunately, this didn’t happen and the show was axed in 2003. However it retains a cult following and several episodes of the show are still available (so I’m informed) on More 4 for your viewing pleasure. If you’d like to blame anyone, I’ve got just one word for you; Hollyoaks.

The Bill (1984)

 When the Bill finished it’s final story in 2010, many felt disheartened, with the show having stood for everything and everyone. The antics of Sun Hill police had been legendary for almost three decades and it was as much a staple of UK television as that bowl of cereal you had for Breakfast in the morning.

And, as good as the show was, nothing could replace the classic (late 80s) version of the show’s theme tune €“ accompanied onscreen by the closing titles and the shot of both a male and female police officer “walking the beat” upon the cobbles. And, yes, while this list is about the opening theme tunes of programmes €“ the Bill’s closing tune was almost identical to it’s opener €“ so I’m going to let it slide. The 88′ theme was composed by Andy Pask and Charlie Morgan, scrapped in 1998 for something that felt a bit more “jazzy” and current, though if you ask me – and many often do – the strengths of a long standing show remain in the familiar nature audiences share with it’s theme tune.

It seem’s there’s just no account for taste, although the fact I can remember playing this stupid game with my younger brother involving hiding from the television because we’d “forgotten to pay the Bill” (being Irish, we didn’t understand the meaning of the word in a Police sense) is clearly indicative of the effects the show had on both ourselves and our long suffering parents.

Funhouse (1989)

Based on the US TV show of the same name, the UK version of Funhouse aired for 10 years on CITV and was presented by Pat Sharpe. There was once a rumor, started on Wikipedia, that Jeremy Kyle presented a week of the programme in 1993 when Pat was on holiday. I’ve never been able to verify whether this is true or not but, if it is, could somebody PLEASE send me that tape?

The tune was actually co-created by Bob Heatlie (should you know him? You certainly should – be created the theme for Animaniacs!) and David Pringle and served as a reminder to children that the school day was over and it was time for some bloody good fun! If you’ve ever been curious as to who the announcer for Funhouse UK was, look no further than Garry King, who currently presents a lunchtime show on Smooth Radio every Sunday.


Gary also did the voice over for the last season of Dale’s Supermarket Sweep, although not (I’m told) any of the other seasons. Children’s television in this period frankly provided some of the best theme tunes going, other notable mentions at this point should include Knightmare and Finder’s Keepers – it’s just a real shame that the quality has dipped so much in recent years. Some of these programmes, although visually dated, still seem fresh and informative when you watch them today. I wonder if you can say the same for the Tweenies and In The Night Garden in 2025. 

MacGyver (1985)

 Armed with an American passport and Scottish heritage (his first name was Angus) there was nothing that Richard Dean Anderson couldn’t do in order to foil the latest terrorist plot.

Many jokes have been made in episodes of Family Guy and the Simpsons among them, about how how MacGyver could conjure out of nothing €“ but asides from the important science he was teaching families – there was a more addictive reason for watching this show; that theme tune.

Yes, in seven glorious seasons the magnificent music that begun every show hardly altered, that instrumental being synonymous with the one man who could “do so much with so few tools” €“ and, if you cared to dance, this was the music to make you get up and dance around too. It defined action, it defined adventure and it also defined Anderson’s mullet €“ which, frankly, I’m a bit disappointed he shaved for Stargate truth be told.

MacGyver returned to US television for a special Mastercard commercial, although this is just implied as opposed to it being officially announced it’s him, and this sparked rumors that Anderson would be reprising the role for an 8th season. Unfortunately, unlike the title of the 5th season episode ‘I Will Always Return’, at time of writing this is most certainly not the case.


Quantum Leap (1989)

 Theorizing that one could time travel within his own lifetime, Dr Sam Beckett stepped forward into the Quantum Leap accelerator and vanished…he awoke to find himself trapped in the past, facing a mirror image that was not his own and driven by an unknown force to change history for the better.

And so began, in my own personal opinion, the best introduction to a show in the history of television. Following the adventures of a misguided scientist and his best friend Al (who appeared in the form of a hologram that only Sam could see and hear) Quantum Leap mixed the incredible combination of drama, intrigue and history into an hourly show. And no two shows, even about the same issue, were ever the same.

The introductory speech given invoked a feeling of sympathy for Sam, who was trapped in his impediment, but also made it clear that he was doing good work and (at the heart of things) he enjoyed it all. The saxophone bridge and orchestral instrumental was inclined to give us the feeling that Sam was our classic hero, always facing obstacles but enjoying things immensely and the fact that he himself never got home is an absolute tragedy. Despite running for 5 seasons (in the last of which the theme was “rocked up” with a guitar hook to insert a more “modern” vibe perhaps) the show was abruptly cancelled and rumors of a film adaptation have been floating around ever since.

There’s even a quite excellent, although unofficial, fan episode involving a story around Princess Diana that was created a few years ago to celebrate the shows 20th anniversary. I hope someone reading this realizes that Sam needs to get home!

Thor; Ragnarock (2017)

Once upon a time,  in the year 2000, it was perhaps possible to make a superhero film without the involvement of every A list actor in the world.  At that time, when James Cameron had been discussing his vision of Spiderman with Leonardo DiCaprio and Arnold Schwarzenegger, there were little more than rumors of what would later become Marvel’s expanded universe.

And it’s a universe which grew to include motion picture actors making cameos in films for fees that would themselves finance independent movies. No, not Stan Lee’s cameo in Fantastic Four, instead we’re talking about the moment when Robert Downey Jnr walked into a bar at the end of The Incredible Hulk to announce they were creators the Avengers. That day was a collective one of sadness for cinema ushers worldwide as they realized two things; people were now going to start peeing in their cups to avoid a bathroom break that might destroy a crucial plot point and “after credit scenes” were going to make their jobs ten times harder on Friday night’s.

Thor Ragnarock has an outstanding cast, with lead performances from Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston and Cate Blanchett alongside pivotal support from Idris Elba, Jeff Goldblum, Sir Anthony Hopkins, Tessa Thompson, Karl Urban and Mark Ruffalo. That’s to say nothing of the ‘cameo’ performances from Benedict Cumberbatch and Sam Neill (playing the Actor Odin) who prove that like Star Wars, James Bond and Harry Potter before it there’s nothing an actor likes more than to appear in a favored franchise.

What can happen with such a huge cast, however, is that both the story and the screen time are so constantly diluted with famous names – even, albeit nostalgically famous – that we’re more concerned with the sound of their voice and reminding ourselves of the fond actors they used to be then the role they’re playing in this movie.  Thankfully, that’s not the case here, as Thor Ragnarock provides a mildly entertaining backdrop as to why all these characters have to save ‘the world’ (but not as we know it) from destruction.

Returning to Asgard after a perilous mission, Thor finds a masquerade on the throne, Loki having placed his father Odin in a retirement home. Shady Acres (the name of the Mental Hospital in Ace Ventura Pet Detective too btw) is being demolished, and Loki has lost him. Dr Strange appears because Loki is on the galactic equivalent of a no fly list and has entered New York without going through customs.  Donald Trump would be proud the Dr is doing his patriotic duty.

But even this twist is only a prelude for the backdrop of the backdrop that makes up the real stories crux, Thor believed dead in a planet which literally collects waste and refuge and sold to the Grand Master (Jeff Goldblum) in order to fight like a Gladiator for his freedom against the Ultimate Champion. That champion turning out to be one of Thor’s long lost friends, certainly lost in the Marvel verse, leads to an interesting chance for further character dissection on a hero who hasn’t had his own solo movie in a while.

There’s a lot going on. Thor and Loki ultimately team to save the world and are helped by a number of Asgaurdians and like minded revolutionaries while every fifteen minutes or so there’s a few jokes thrown in for good measure. The film definitely has a look and feel of comedy to it, not slapstick but there are enough laughs while watching alone to make you feel its been made for the cinema crowd of a family event where it raises some chuckles.

That’s not a bad thing, the jokes help relieve any tension in a family friendly movie and make it light, funny and fun, but what is a bad thing is that the movie subsequently fails to follow through on so much. 

Now I know that it has a limited run time and there’s only so much that can be on screen, but hints and tips are scattered throughout the script about who characters are and where they came from. Bruce Banner is a perfect example, as he struggles with the Hulk, realizing for the first time that there is a distinct split personality in which Hulk may reign supreme and have full control. Its a revealing moment and it could have gotten much darker than it’s pushed, but in the end, the movie doesn’t answer that question at all and we’re left wondering whether Hulk has mentally grown as an independent creature. That fight is definitely for another day.

The Grand Master is also another interesting character, described as the creator of the world and the first person to come here. Nothing more is discussed of his origins and it could have been ultimately a fascinating opportunity to examine how and why. There’s a little laugh about the serious subject of slavery, with his insistence the slaves be called ‘those people with forced jobs’, yet no real discussion as to why the Grand Master created a game so resembling Roman Gladiatorial Combat.

At the end of the day though, this is a Thor movie and it’s his show. It’s not as close minded as Ant Man, it’s obvious from Spiderman Homecoming that Marvel is not able to take a single chance or even have a single storyline for a main character, so they’re squeezing as much into this flick as possible. You do learn a lot about the god of thunder and he learns more about himself, but you still can’t help feeling he brought too many people along for the ride. 

Die Hard (1988)

Attending a screening of Die Hard at Newcastle’s historic Tyneside Cinema has become somewhat of an annual tradition. Monday’s visit provided me with the third attempt since 2015 to relive all the action and splendor of this rather unexpected Hollywood hit on the big screen. And despite originally being released in July 1988 the film has gained a remarkable amount of traction in the intervening years as a Christmas Classic.

Of course, Die Hard strains from the traditional narratives of most action films of its period, and with good reason. The story (if you’re completely unaware) is about New York Policeman John McClane (Bruce Willis). McClane is travelling to Los Angeles to visit his estranged wife Holly, played by Bonnie Bedelia. Arriving on Christmas Eve he finds a work party interrupted by the arrival of terrorists, led by German Hans Gruber (Alan Rickman) and quickly decides to tackle the groups intentions and fight back alone.

The casting of the film in itself was an interesting choice, as the studio had little faith in Bruce Willis ability to command the role. Early promotion of the film featured attention towards the action in the plot rather than the star and even Willis has admitted to only truly deciding key facets of McClane’s character mid way through shooting. On the reverse, Holly’s character has a much more prominent involvement than you might expect from the traditional “damsel in distress” and Gruber’s own calm, collected exterior is essentially the narrative of the story.  Without his plan to extort money from the Nakatomi corporation the film has little to no basis. McClane’s estrangement from his wife could be settled in a few minutes as a will he or won’t he.

Credit must also be given to the films use of notable film actors from the era. Paul Gleason,  William Atherton and Robert Davi all perform small but pivotal supporting roles that – added to their performances in Ghostbusters, The Goonies and The Breakfast Club (for example) – make it seem almost like extensions of those characters. The film also strays from the traditional in other areas too, for example, a scene in which McClane and Gruber meet on the roof of the building. It’s unconventional as neither the two should meet until the climax, but was the result of a realization on set that Rickman could do a convincing American accent and so was hastily included.

Seeing the film on the big screen after 30 years also helps us realize mistakes, especially if we’ve watched it a few times before. In one scene where McClane descends a stairwell as sprinklers fight a blaze, a Christmas tree is seen to fall from behind him. Monetarily he checks, unaware as to whether there is a terrorist lurking behind, and you can just make out the silhouetted shadow of the stage hand who pushed it over. Other scenes, such as Ellis’ “negotiation” with Gruber allows us to revisit the traditional – with a deliberate pause on audio as someone pours a can of Coca Cola. How little things change.

The film displays all the qualities of a Hollywood Summer blockbuster but the decision to set it during Christmas (a decision which predated the script, based on the original concept, the 1979 novel Nothing Lasts Forever) actually places it in a rather unusual demographic. Appealing to those who love the holiday, and those who don’t, it uses Christmas to it’s full advantage in some of the most memorable scenes – including when McClane hides a gun on his back with wrapping tape and when he uses a Santa hat and a yuletide message on a deceased terrorist. But the amount of violence and action resolves to make the message that even those offended by Christmas cheer will have something to enjoy in this one.

The only enigma in the film is that of Sgt Al Powell. The character, who provides John McClane with support and assistance throughout the film, received fourth billing in both this and the films sequel (despite only making a brief cameo in the latter) and the actor who portrayed him appeared in both this, Ghostbusters (as a correctional officer) and Crocodile Dundee – arguably three of the most iconic films of the decade – yet sadly Reginald Vel Johnson never managed the successes of Bruce Willis or Alan Rickman.

At it’s core, Die Hard is the ultimate action film – it contains no end of action and suspense while also fulfilling in dialogue, story, condition and humor. And all you need to do in exchange is survive the mummers in the audience as an attendee recites the classic quote you’re just about to hear just before you hear it. Michael Kamen’s score leads to welcome us to a use of ‘Ode to Joy’ and we’re inclined to agree. Not one to be missed.

Die Hard plays at Tyneside Cinema, Newcastle, on Saturday December 23rd 2017

https://www.tynesidecinema.co.uk/film-and-events/view/die-hard

Having a McDoubt; Living in the Age of Sexual Harassment Hollywood

Earlier today a friend contacted me through social media. I hadn’t heard from them in a while, and saw the notification on my phone as a chance to reconnect, albeit all too briefly in this super information highway kinda world. When I read their dialogue, however, it was nothing like the pleasantries I’d expected to hear. My “friend” had taken exception at the use of a promotional picture on my website.

Informally launched in February 2017, I’ve tried to update this page when I can, but work commitments and real life have made it somewhat challenging – especially when I like every piece on the site to at least have something entertaining or informative to say representative of my voice. Otherwise, I might as well post other peoples original or copied content on my personal space, and that’s what Facebook is for.

Also working within the media bubble, such as film, radio and television; the message informed me that the sender would very much like if I removed a picture from my website featuring myself and director Morgan Spurlock. For those who don’t already know, Spurlock is a director who first shot to fame with the documentary Supersize Me in 2004. Although criticized afterwards for its overreaction and flamboyant tabloid esque journalism, Supersize Me actually raised questions in the cinema going public about their consumption of fast food (in this case, predominantly McDonalds) and also the health concerns it might pose if someone was to include it as part of their staple diet.

In 2008 Spurlock created the now largely forgotten (and well aged) Where In The World Is Osama Bin Laden?; a documentary allegedly focused on finding Osama Bin Laden in the hills of Afghanistan. I’ve only seen this film once, but I remember it clearly, because I met Morgan Spurlock after the screening. He’d been in Dublin on the European leg of a media tour to help promote the movie and I found myself overwhelmed by the amount of people who didn’t realize he was actually going to attend the screening in person and answer questions afterwards. In a mad rush to the escalator, I managed to be the first person to leave the screen, asking Mr Spurlock if he’d mind posing as a random man (who was attempting to reach the toilet) agreed to take our photo.

Director Morgan Spurlock (a huge early inspiration for me) and myself in 2008, pictured in Cineworld Dublin

I’ll never forget how excited I was going into work that evening at Chartbusters Video Store to tell everyone I’d managed to take the greatest photo with one of the coolest handlebar mustaches in Hollywood. And, being fair, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles shirt I was wearing at the time obviously helped seal the deal. It was one of my first photographed experiences meeting “celebrities” and as I look back on the photographs in my possession also one of the oldest I have.

Fast forward nine years from that brief meeting, and a friend is sending me a message, asking me to remove the photo from my website. Primarily, they say, this is because my association with said photo is embarrassing in light of Spurlock’s recent admissions of sexual misconduct. And they’re very serious about it too.

Admittedly, this is a new one for me. I’ll admit to being very indifferent when I first heard the news of Harvey Weinstein and, in similar vein, Kevin Spacey.  I’ll admit to being a fan of Kevin Spacey’s work, House of Cards has been one of my favorite shows of recent years, and films Spacey has made – such as ‘The Life of David Gale’ and ‘Ordinary Decent Criminal’ have a pride of place in my collection. Not because I own every copy of every film he’s made, but because I rank his work as an actor very highly, and separate the man from the entertainer in the role he’s playing. 

That, I would hope people agree, is very different from me saying we should immediately hire Spacey to work on every project available to him and ignore all misgivings. We should not. But there should be a fine line, particularly in Journalism, where writers are quick to maintain the difference between an entertainer performing a role and a man who has acted inappropriately – and allegedly, illegally – in a number of personal cases. Hulk Hogan’s recent court case brings to mind this very principle, where do we draw the line between the performer/entertainer and their personal identity.

The question with Spurlock remains unchanged, however, should I immediately decide to erase any – albeit extremely brief – association with him from my website because of his actions. And the answer is no. I condemn Spacey and I condemn Spurlock for his personal actions but I will not begin purposefully ignoring to watch the films he appears in or pretending he has never existed or directed. And this is simply because, when it comes down to it, I don’t know the man on a personal level and he hasn’t wronged me in any way. In Spurlock’s case specifically, this photo is a memory for me, a good and positive memory in my media career – am I to undo this and simply pretend it didn’t exist?

There might be arguments that there are other photos, other potential memories to share, but it forces me to invoke censorship in my own life. It forces me to remove something I actually care about, not because of the individuals involved, but because of the memory and the time it represents.

I shall not be removing this photograph because it represents a time and a place. And because, although it might be critical to say Morgan Spurlock has admitted to sexual misconduct to capitalize on both it’s (and his) relevance within the world media; these are the actions of private individuals behind relatively closed doors. 

I feel that if there is one thing the Hollywood allegations have done it has brought to my attention the step down of the male gender in 2017. And I want to be very clear before I elaborate that this is not a sexist or underhanded attack on female gender or empowerment. I welcome equal rights for both sexes and I condemn sexual misconduct in the strongest terms and support any person affected by #MeToo but I ask where – in a world that holds Donald Trump as the most significant example of white male power – a young man might look for an example of hope? In a world every Johnny Depp is forgiven and every Mel Gibson recovers, who are the positive male role models we can depend upon?