Category Archives: Games Reviews

From Bedrooms to Billions: The PlayStation Revolution (2020, Documentary)

Coming in at just under three hours, this documentary is an incredibly comprehensive look at the ground-breaking work the Playstation system did in helping to shape the current video game market.

Created by filmmakers Anthony and Nicola Caulfield, ‘The PlayStation Revolution’ is the third film in a series of hidden stories around gaming’s greatest accomplishments. And it wouldn’t be as comprehensive a history without the stories from the people who were there on the front line, with those contributing on camera including Hideo Kojima, Mark Cerny and Jim Ryan.

Whilst it might have been more accessible as a Netflix series, split into twenty-minute episodes for easier digestion by an unfamiliar audience, anyone with even a passing interest in Sony’s creation is bound to find this informative and engaging.

Final Fantasy VII Remake (PS4)

For those wishing to read my 2012 article on the original Final Fantasy VII, including facts about that games development and what the franchise means to me, please feel free to check out the link http://waynegmadden.com/final-fantasy-vii-ps1

I also write this article in response to the article published by Metro on April 26th 2020 whose author said he felt Square Soft would regret having remade the game and started this project – https://metro.co.uk/2020/04/26/square-enix-going-regret-ever-starting-final-fantasy-7-remake-readers-feature-12607826/ – I believe this is completely wrong.

As already discussed in a previous article, there is no game which – for me – holds more nostalgia and delight, than that of Final Fantasy VII. Indeed, even in 2019, I was still downloading the XBox One port of the title and the Nintendo Switch port of the title; both to examine and criticise the engines of these systems whilst (believe it or not) still exploring the game on PS1 and through emulation on PSVita. You could say I’m a little obsessed.

A remake of the original game – released in 1997 on PlayStation – has actually been in discussion for almost as long the game itself. It was first decided that Final Fantasy VII, VIII and IX would be remastered for the PlayStation 2 in the early 2000s. It was said the games would be sold separately and not really much more beside, though it was evident from the beginning that it was the 7th instalment fans were most eager to get their hands on.

In 2005 and then again, on the games 10th anniversary, in 2007; there was conformation that a reboot of the seventh instalment was being planned. However, other projects demanded precedence, and so Square were unable to comment further on when the games would see the light of day. Soon, in light of other developments and the PlayStation 3 – and even 4 – many simply forgot that the title had been promised, especially when other ports of the original on current generation consoles started to appear as a viable experience.

However, there were four people who never forgot. At a meeting between the four men most responsible for the game; producer and series creator Hironobu Sakaguchi, director and co-writer Yoshinori Kitase, artist Yusuke Naora, character designer Tetsuya Nomura, and writer Kazushige Nojima – all agreed they’d reached “that age” and if waiting longer, it could potentially be the case they’d be too old to work on a reboot at all. This led to an understanding that it was now or never. The official announcement came in 2015. It was happening.

When you think of the scope of this project, similarities can be drawn with Guns N’ Roses ‘Chinese Democracy’ album, if only because the online community became so transfixed on it’s legendary and mythical appearance. In the same vein, many began to consider that the project might never be released, and since we live in an age where consumers are used to receiving something almost immediately after it’s announced – the idea of waiting for anything seems unrealistic. But FF7 wasn’t just any game, it was a title Sony had initially spent 1 Million Dollars promoting prior to launch in 1997. And whose original budget had exceeded 40 Million Dollars.

Additionally, whilst it might be able to count on the automatic support of a percentage of gamers, it was newer/younger players that the title also needed to capture, considering their wants and needs – people unfamiliar with the story, the nostalgia and the game play. This was, of course, just part of the reason for the Switch and XBox 1 ports, they allowed the current generation to capture as much of the PlayStation’s original magic as possible – whilst also lining pockets and using the market research data.

Rival games like Last of Us, God of War and Spider Man also played their roles; there was absolutely no point in Square – or Sony – releasing this game at a time when the majority of gamers might be interested in another similarly exclusive title. Like the original, this game needed to be centre of attention, though perhaps even more so – since there really was so much more to prove this time around. And there was twice as much pressure.

With Kingdom Hearts 3 another main focus for Square Soft, the studio couldn’t give full attention until Final Fantasy VII until this project was completed, leading to rumours that the project had been scrapped at some point in late 2017. These rumours were always denied, but it wasn’t until May 2019 that the first teaser trailer was announced – and again it wouldn’t be until June that any playable functionality was shown – but when this happened, it won several awards at E3 2019 including ‘Best Console Game’ before it had even been released.

Pushed back in January 2020, due to concerns over tweaking the titles already mammoth production, fans were treated to a playable demo. We played the games first chapter – within the Shinra reactor – as Cloud Strife teamed with Avalanche. There is no denying that the game looked incredible and those first moments were a chance to actually control the modern day Cloud for the first time. But would it still be enough to make sure that the game became the long awaited worthwhile success?

In it’s first three days, it shipped and sold over 3.5 million copies, fears were somewhat dissipated. In all, it had become one of the single biggest game launches for the PlayStation 4.

For those unaware, Final Fantasy VII takes place in the fictional city of Midgar, you play as Cloud Strife – a mercenary who takes a job with environmental terrorists Avalanche. Avalanche is led by Barrett Wallace and their mission is to help aid the planet, by stopping the use of Mako, a natural energy source harvested by the Shinra Electrical Corporation. Cloud is a former SOLIDER operative, who are the private guard of Shinra, and upon the request of childhood friend Tifa Lockheart decides to assist Avalanche on their plight. Cloud has his own demons, however, plagued by the death of another SOLIDER operative, named Sephiroth; known as one of the greatest warriors who has ever lived, he is struggling to come to terms with this and his own past.

The game’s original incarnation took you from Midgar to the world, literally traversing the games map across several continents. In this remake, you play about 10%-15% of the original title, and only perform the original Midgar missions, whilst at the same time expanding upon that initial story and going further into the details of the timeline. This gives for a rather unique perspective, allowing the player to focus on the initial missions (which they remember) but also including ‘Director’s Cut’ style components that the game simply wasn’t able to facilitate at the time, for a number of reasons.

Storytelling has also been altered, in some cases drastically, in order to atone to the wishes of both the online community and also the wishes of its creators. A great comparison for this would be Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight Trilogy, which effectively modernised and ‘reinvented’ the idea of Batman in a modern setting. By taking a more authentic approach to their franchise, Final Fantasy VII is a more believable story; and that might seem strange from a game that is effectively a classic JRPG; but it’s one which originally strove to break rules and boundaries on it’s initial release and looks to do the same here.

***Published as unfinished piece****

Full Motion Action

I’ve been a gamer for many years. Gaming is a huge passion of mine and has arguably taken up more time than any other hobby or pastime I’ve been engaged in. At any one time, I’ve owned at least two consoles, be that a portable device such as a PSVita or Nintendo DS; and a home console such as a PlayStation or an XBox.

Now, despite loving gaming so much, I’ve not really improved at it over the years. The old adage of practice makes perfect doesn’t really apply to gaming, as by the logic of that statement, I should have been champion several times over. As long as there have been games, gaming fans have been arguing over what their intention is, whether it’s to challenge us and mentally stimulate or whether it’s really designed for a relaxing and unwinding chance to escape the rigours of the day.

Gaming is now a trillion dollar industry. The Financial Times reports that as more people are forced to stay indoors particularly, during the last several months of lock down across the globe, the gaming industry has reaped the benefits. If possible, people are actually spending more time online, and investing more into digital currency then ever before. And there are games for every type of gamer; challenges, stimulants, simulators, relaxing games and even a virtual representation of a real hobby, sport or pastime. For me, one of the most interesting series of games has always been that which is focused around full motion video, or FMV, for short.

FMV is a narration tool used in gaming where actual video footage is employed, either partially or wholly, to direct the narrative. As technology initially advanced in the 90s, a series of titles was released across formats such as the Sega CD and Laserdisc to create “interactive movies” which were almost solely devised of actual video footage that the viewer could control. Choices were given in the same vein as original text adventure titles on the ZX Spectrum where a player would need to act in a specific way to either avoid death or dismay and ultimately end the game. Some games just employed this technology in “cut scenes” between actual gaming, with an example being the Wing Commander series for PlayStation and PC.

In this specific example (for the third game in the franchise) developers Origin Systems created huge set pieces and hired noted and respected actors such as Mark Hamill and Thomas F. Wilson. This footage rewarded the player for completing tasks by advancing the story narrative and also creating a rather compelling movie that remains interesting to watch; even to this day!

For this article I wanted to give you a run down of some of my favourite full motion video games ever made. Indeed, this list could use games from any point in history, as developers Wales Interactive are just one example who’ve convinced us FMV titles have not exactly been forgotten. Some of these titles you may be aware of, especially considering their modern day console re-releases on PlayStation and Switch; although other titles you may be so aware of, and it’s my hope that you’ll check them out where possible and maybe even give some YouTube footage a watch to remind yourself. That said, in all cases, nothing beats the original experience of playing these titles and learning of all the secrets within.

Black Mirror; Bandersnatch (2019)

OK, so right at the top of the list, I’m cheating. And I’m sorry about that. But I do need to give a moment to talk about Black Mirror’s phenomenal stand alone project ‘Bandersnatch’ which was – and I trust still will be for a while – exclusive to Netflix. Black Mirror is a programme co-created by Journalist Charlie Brooker. Brooker was born in 1971 (and that’s quite important) and began his career prominently coming to attention as a Video Games Journalist. Black Mirror itself is a “monster of the week” type format show which employs an isolated narrative in the style of the Twilight Zone. Though the themes can switch between fantasy, horror and romance etc. and a lot of Brooker’s own episodes tend to focus around the idea of gaming in some form.

Bandersnatch was released as its own separate piece entirely, exclusively to Netflix, in 2019. Set in 1987 it tells the story of Stefan Butler who gets the opportunity to write and design his own video game – Bandersnatch – for the company Tuckersoft. The story itself is intertwined with Stefan’s own traumatic past and the subject matter of Bandersnatch, which is based on fictional writer Jerome F. Davies (a Hunter S Thompson type character) and his own murder suicide. Bandersnatch the book, upon which Stefan is basing the game, is a choose your own adventure novel; with different paths and possibilities for the reader.

Equally, Bandersnatch itself (for the viewer, that’s us) is a choose your own adventure episode. At various points throughout the narrative we’ll be encouraged to choose one of two or three answers; dependent upon our choices, the narrative will play out accordingly. Of course, like a lot of choose your own adventure novels, the story will reach an untimely conclusion should you choose the wrong path – and Bandersnatch has more than a few places where the road can mislead you. While the episode itself is a phenomenal recreation of the time period and a very unique way of introducing this type of interactivity to those who wouldn’t normally engage in it, it’s not strictly speaking a video game. But I hope that you’ll forgive me nonetheless and check it out, as it’s easily the most accessible (readily available) instalment on this list.

The X Files Game (1998)

Released for Windows by Fox Interactive in 1998, The X Files Game was a title largely accessible by virtue of the fact that it was based on a popular television show, for which it had an established fan base. The title was later released on PlayStation in 1999, at which time I myself played it, and became intimately aware with its workings. Whilst the premise of the show was based around a division of the FBI which worked with paranormal or other unexplained phenomenon, the X Files game saw you play as the unknown Craig Wilmore, an agent working for the Seattle Field Office and investigating the unexplained disappearance of Mulder and Scully, the title characters from the show.

One of the main criticism of the game at the time, was that although Mulder and Scully both appear within a portion of the game, they are largely absent from our screens. Neither do you get to play as Mulder or Scully at any stage, although you do find yourselves interacting with such series regulars as Mitch Pileggi and The Lone Gunmen. An interesting fact at this point is that the Lone Gunmen series, which itself was short lived, was actually co-created by future Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan. Regardless, the title does present a competent cast of actors, who naturally reflect off of each other and don’t appear to be either rigid or awkward like other similar titles.

The PlayStation instalment of the game is based across a whopping four discs whilst the Windows game was based across – wait for it – eight, as you play what is an extended interactive episode searching for the agents. What’s probably most incredible looking back is just how much work went into this title, with little Easter eggs I’m still finding today, scenes that were filmed which have no relation to the narrative but create new possibilities and paths for replay. The game was filmed on Digital Betacam tape with Sony cameras and captured using Power Macintosh’s running Adobe Premiere and Media 100. It cost $6 Million to create, one for each hour of footage shot for the game, and production took four years in total.

As indicated in the photo above, if you want to be as happy as Gillian Anderson, I’d strongly suggest playing this title on PlayStation with an official PlayStation Mouse. Alongside titles like ‘Riven’ and ‘Broken Sword’ it’s one of the few titles which work with the PlayStation Mouse but it’s well worth the additional expense. With a reboot of the X Files series having happened in the last few years I’ve been surprised not to see this game rebooted and remastered for a new audience.

Golden Nugget (1996)

Golden Nugget was developed by Abalone Entertainment and initially slated to be released for PlayStation in 1996, although it was subsequently developed by Virgin Interactive in 1997. The game itself is a gambling simulation and features several games of chance in a Las Vegas casino setting; something which has proved popular across every format imaginable pretty much since the invention of gaming. What’s unique about this particular title, however, is that it used simulated footage of the real life Golden Nugget casino and was blatantly a large advertisement for the premises.

The design and model of the flooring is identical to it’s “real life” counterpart and, to the keen eye among you, the game was released for PlayStation on two discs – something of a rarity for a gambling simulator. This is because the second disc contained the games story mode, including 45 minutes of footage featuring Batman actor Adam West in the title role. Certainly, praise needs to be given to developers for trying to find some way to make the game more appealing, and the inclusion of such an iconic actor in this way made for entertaining – albeit usually awkward – cut scenes. Of course, there’s not much interactivity in these scenes, but considering the game wasn’t released outside of North America it still remains something of a rarity today.

You may also remember Virgin Interactive as responsible – in part – for the original Resident Evil title, no doubt their contribution to include the full motion video material at the beginning of that game.

Night Trap (1992)

Being honest, I couldn’t have made this list without Night Trap, as it’s probably the most famous example of full motion video gaming in history. Recently, the title celebrated it’s 25th Anniversary with a re-release on PS4 and Switch and a physical format release from Limited Run Games in North America. Developed by Digital Pictures, it was actually recorded in 1987, and so was scheduled for release on the Sega CD in 1992. But the game’s initial destination was the Hasbro NEMO – a format so deep in development it was cancelled a mere month before launch. So the footage itself was kept and the game play redeveloped for Sega CD.

The story involves a group of teenagers spending a typical Friday sleepover at a cabin in the woods. The teenagers don’t realise that the cabins inhabitants, including two of their classmates, are actually vampires; and they’re being hunted as prize game. Of course, the teenagers have backup, since the awkwardly named SCAT are a bunch of marines straight out of Aliens and monitor the cabin to try and bring the family down. You play an unknown controller of the cameras, who monitors the various rooms looking for opportunities to aid your colleagues and also killing monsters using the strange – and conveniently placed – trap doors throughout. You’re also aided by one of the teenagers in the party, who happens to be an undercover agent.

Things can go two ways; you can spend so much time focusing on the cameras to trap the monsters that you’ll miss all the cheesy dialogue and action in the other rooms, or you can focus on the cheesy dialogue and completely ignore the impending nightmare that awaits. There are several different endings, depending on how many people you save and when, and the game definitely feels like a less advanced version of ‘Until Dawn’ – which proudly remains one of my favourite titles to this day. This game may also have been on your radar because of the controversy it gathered upon it’s original release, when in December 1993 a United States Senate committee criticised the game (along with Mortal Kombat) for being unnecessarily violent and “disgusting”. This led to criticisms from senators that the game was responsible for damaging America’s youth, the developers themselves responding that it was a clear indication the senator had not even played the game.

Late Shift (2017)

Released by Wales Interactive in 2017, and screened at the Raindance Film Festival among others, Late Shift is certainly example of a modern and 4K respectable looking interactive video game. As the title suggests it follows the character on an overnight shift for work, what should be a quiet night, but ultimately turns out involving him in a heist, kidnapping, murder and the Chinese Triads. Once again you choose the responses and, if you choose the right ones, you’ll make it through the game relatively intact. Then, depending upon which decisions you make in the final act will determine the outcome with eight possible endings to unlock.

The inclusion of “alternative/deleted scenes” and the different endings mean there is a real replay value in this title. Additionally, it looks beautiful, with the opening shots of London and the Tube giving the game a phenomenal starting point. The colour and saturation in this game are incredible and, compared to anything else on this list (with the possible exception of Bandersnatch) you’re unlikely to play a better looking game. For those of us who are used to FMV titles being analogue and having to fit all this data on the tiny PlayStation or PC discs – relatively tiny in comparison to the size of quality video footage – this is a game you need to play which moves this genre firmly into the 21st Century.

One thing I particularly enjoyed about moving these titles into the modern age is the deliberate urgency of the decision making; and when faced with a choice the player doesn’t have time to decide, they need to pick one or the other within seconds. This is also a practical response to advanced technology as well, since the response rate of the game play is a lot more seamless than it’s older compatriots. Whilst some noted the games continuity errors on review, I have to be honest, this isn’t something I was looking out for or something I noticed and I’ve probably played this game 20 times on several different formats. I am still unsure what Eurogamer meant by that myself.

When I originally began this list myself I had no idea how far the term interactive movie actually went and that there was an interactive film released in 1967 named ‘Kinoautomat’ and I encourage you to read the story of this film and why it was banned in Communist Czechoslovakia. It’s incredible just how far this rabbit whole goes and so, with that aside, the final entrant on my list…

Mad Dog McCree (1990)

Before Red Dead Redemption, there was Mad Dog McCree. Released for Arcades and LaserDisc in 1990, Mad Dog McCree is a Western in which you play as the silent unknown – a bit like A Few Dollars More – but that’s where the Clint Eastwood comparisons will end. Mad Dog and his gang have given the town of UFT a hard time, and they’re fed up. The player is unknown to the residents of UFT, but within seconds of his or her arrival, a pistol is jammed into their palm and they’re provided with permission — nay, strict orders — to murder any vaguely threatening humans they encounter with no fear of legal repercussions.

I first played this title in Arcades and it was a fantastically enjoyable light gun game; one which was made even more impressive at the time because it featured full motion video, allowing you to engage more as a player with the “advanced graphics” of real people. It was also helped massively by the set pieces and design of the stage, which helped production value too. Of course, it was also extremely comical – perhaps deliberately so – to reflect attention away from the fact that you’re murdering strangers left and right.

The game itself spawned several sequels but it’s the original, probably because of the nostalgia, which remains so near and dear to my heart. Should you ever get a chance to play this game (the most modern version I’m aware of was released for the Wii) then I’d highly recommend it.

And that’s my list, as always, I welcome your comments below…

Physical vs. Digital Gaming

A few months ago now, I convinced my partner that purchasing a new Xbox One was the right move to make, and although I’d had Xbox consoles in the past, this one would be the first “all digital” console I’d ever owned.

For many years now, I have had a love hate relationship with gaming, in that although I find it an enjoyable pastime, I am also driven to frustration by it.

Unlock-able levels, progression through games, the achievement of trophies and much more besides means that – at times – gaming has left me in equal parts elated and enraged. And although I fully recognise the general price of new release games haven’t risen that much in the past 20 years, in comparison perhaps to other entertainment mediums, I still feel rather upset if I purchase a title for £50 only to later find I can’t get past Level 1.

This is actually something of a shared experience I’ve inherited from my father. In 1991, he purchased a copy of ‘Terminator 2; Judgement Day’ published by Ocean on Commodore 64. I still have firm memories of the family gathering around to play the game at the time – I can’t have been more than 6 or 7 – and haunted by the lack of progression past Level 2, as John is chased by the T1000 into a storm drain. It never prevented me from (much) later enjoying the film, granted, but it was an early example of how sometimes a pastime can be the most frustrating thing in the world.

So, what has all that got to do with Digital Gaming?

Well, my Dad was a member of a social gaming network, and they frequently met to trade games or discuss titles between themselves. Long before the Internet, this kind of gathering was very much in the first person and a monthly basis in a local marketplace. But the format has not changed at all, since members often traded games with each other, sold the games they could not finish to other members and swapped solutions and cheat codes with each other. In the mid-90s, when PlayStation started to control the gaming stratosphere, rental titles at your local Blockbuster made it possible to enjoy a game for the weekend – and if you didn’t like it or couldn’t play it – you’d paid much less than you might to own it outright.

But, with the advent of the internet and the development of modern technology at the turn of the millennium, console giants began to create more complex and large-scale projects whilst traditional gaming mediums in the “real world” retreated. As the creation and licensing of big budget games became more expensive, studios and developers began looking at ways to save money. In truth, the production and manufacturing of games and their accessories (manuals, boxes etc.) and its subsequent shipping was a huge additional cost which, economically, it made financial sense to attempt to eradicate.

The first step was to digitise components of the game, and so you’d find that certain titles were released without a manual, or if they were – it was abridged – to use less paper and for it to weigh less (adding up each game and each box, that’s a substantial saving per thousand unit) and you’d often find this manual was included – in full – as part of the game on your system.

Thereafter, companies like Sony and Microsoft fixed their attention towards digital content, which could either add to a game, improve it after release (to fix bugs and tweaks) or which allowed a gamer to purchase a title in full without ever leaving the screen. Indeed, with modern upgrades and technology, it is entirely possible to begin packaging and shipping a game for release into the world whilst still working on the latest upgrade to solve the problem before anyone even receives it.

Whilst in the early 90’s the size of the add on contents file might have been more than sufficient to create 10 new Commodore 64 titles on floppy disc, this digital medium meant that hard drive spaces needed to increase exponentially to cope with demand. And where we would normally boot up the Commodore before dinner, with it ready to go when we had finished 20 minutes later, gamers began to express impatience if they needed to wait even a few seconds – Loading Screens and wait times becoming a new enemy.

Sony first attempted a digital only platform in 2009, with the PSP Go, which was a UMD less version of their popular handheld. Given the vast catalogue of games available to purchase on the store at that time – through PS3 and PSP – gamers were able to download and play a wealth of titles through the format. The Xbox 360, which had launched in Nov 2005, was arguably the first console after PC to bring digital gaming to the consumer in a big way – and Sony’s handheld was perhaps a trial run at how a digital only system would be consumed in the marketplace.

Fans reacted positively to the PSP Go, but negatively to the idea of losing their accumulated catalogues of PSP titles, ones which – like Final Fantasy 7 Crisis Core – were purchased physically and could only be played on UMD. Around this time, I bought my first digital content, a copy of Final Fantasy VII and Metal Gear Solid, the PS1 games I had loved so much, through PSN. Despite having a copy of both games on PS1, and the means to play them, their digital purchase meant I could play them portable on the system of my choice and that I could also use them with a more modern television. That purchase would, ultimately, also inspire me to sell a number of pieces of my collection – which were otherwise taking up space, when I later emigrated from Ireland to Scotland.

Now, back in 1991, my Dad would often – albeit frowned upon – purchase copies of games created ‘at a discount’. This made economic sense, and it was practical too, since (if you were not very good at a game) it took the sting out of a full price purchase. Modern technology means that gaming piracy has, to a large extent, been all but eradicated. And digital content has certainly helped with this. Developer sales and discounts, incentives online which avoid needing to include a retailer, mean digital content can often be more affordable than its physical counterpart beyond a certain point in the release cycle.

If gamers are saving money, that’s good news for gamers and good news for developers, with many indie composers relying solely on a digital platform – being unable to afford to create a physical product (at least initially) and hoping consumers will purchase their titles at a reduced or discounted price.

In the days of the ZX Spectrum it was often not uncommon for a game to have been developed by just one person using a home brew format, and digital content allows small development teams and lone individuals the chance – once again – to create truly great games that can be released in a mass market forum. One example of these titles is Rocket League, which itself is a sequel, released originally as Supersonic Acrobatic Rocket-Powered Battle-Cars on PlayStation 3 in 2008. What began as a small development team slowly grew – to the point that Rocket League itself received more pre orders than any other title when initially released on digital format – and is still being ported and having content developed for it today, over 5 years after its original release.

Personally, I’m not that fond of paying £50 for a digital copy of Resident Evil 3 (which I did recently) only to realise I’m unable to trade the title once completed, maybe helping me to purchase another game or make some money back. Capcom, the developers of the Resident Evil series, have been some of the most outspoken developers against second hand sales – going so far as to include a bug within games (see Resident Evil ‘The Mercenaries’ 3DS) preventing the deletion of save data. Although then Capcom VP Christian Svenson went on record to say this was not a business decision, many at the time felt it was a way to attempt to curb this kind of trade. Regardless of the reasoning, and probably because of the controversy, Capcom have not since repeated this move.

Jill really regretted lending Kendo her copy of ‘Sensible Soccer’ just prior to the outbreak in Raccoon City

On the opposite side of my own argument, however, I can acknowledge that digital gaming has done me an immense favour. Titles like ‘Resident Evil 3’, ‘Grand Theft Auto V’ and ‘Batman Arkham Knight’ on Xbox One’s digital console may not physically be on my shelf but will remain with me whenever I need them. And my original Final Fantasy VII and Metal Gear Solid purchases from 2008/9 remain – to this day – on my PSN account, whenever I need to re download them. Circumstances over time have meant that there have often been occasions when I’ve needed to sell a console or material to pay essential bills; and having that digital account preserved for future use has been huge relief, not just on my wallet!

I could therefore argue that I have owned these titles for 12 years, far longer than any other physical game I still have today. I was upset about having to repurchase ‘Final Fantasy VII’ on the Xbox One (the 2019 port of the game) to play the same title I loved on another system – but this was my choice, and allowed me to once again experience an improved functionality and timings added with the latest revision.

The second-hand marketplace, however, very much has its place. Being able to browse titles in a store like CEX allows for me to discover, in much the same way as another gamer might browse the sale section of the digital shop; what is new to me and worth a cheap purchase.

In 2018 I bought a copy of the ‘Arkham Collection’ on Xbox One and needed to return it, owing to a broken disc – another unfortunate side effect of physical titles – but as CEX themselves do not take any account for the codes or digital content that might available in the box of your purchase, I had already attempted to redeem these, finding to my surprise that they were all valid. Subsequently, I had returned a title worth £20 to me for a full refund, but the codes earned from this experience were valued at £36. Proving it always pays to check the codes.

And whilst some may also argue the high street itself is dying, and this could be argued to be true, the advent of Internet shopping in its place means that gamers are still very much given the choice between physical and digital gaming. It does not necessarily have to be on the shelves of your local gaming store (provided you even have one) to be purchased in a physical format.

In recent years, physical gaming has fought back, with companies like Play Asia and Limited Run Games producing physical copies of titles in specific numbers as their USP – allowing those who want to purchase the game physically to do so – but not limiting the games scope or fanbase.

Additionally, by producing games in such limited numbers, it generates hype around a title, sells for a concentrated period at a fixed price (to a largely committed and dedicated audience) and saves on the immense shipping costs otherwise associated with producing so many more titles for the manufacturer and online retailers. Limited Run Games fluctuate in price, as you would expect, and second-hand sale and trade is by no means discouraged either, meaning there’s always a market for those titles.

Ultimately, I love and accept my new Xbox and I really like the convenience and the ease of digital gaming, particularly with current world events. But I will never rely solely on digital titles, as physical gaming represents such a huge part of my gaming memories, from those days on the Commodore, to current respite with my PS Vita.

Whilst I suspect I already know the answer, I’d be curious as to whether a younger generation of gamer, without those physical memories and limitations; will still have such a nostalgia and place such importance on physical gaming. It is always going to be cheaper to avoid a bricks and mortar store, and it is always going to be cheaper to buy digital content.

But in my mind, a healthly mix, of both physical and digital, is enough to ensure even the most casual gamer can make the most of their favourite pastime.

Let’s Play – Terminator (XBox360)

About five years ago I went through a stage of doing ‘Let’s Play’ videos. I’d purchased some cheaper software, allowing for my lack of expensive equipment, and with a laptop and an XBox 360 I’d started recording videos of me playing games online. There’s only a handful of this footage remaining, to be honest, and I think – looking back – that it carried well.

Primarily I played ‘Terminator Salvation’ for XBox One and PS3; a game which had been singled out as being one of the easiest games to obtain a Platinum Trophy for – at that time – as all you really needed to do was complete the game on a set difficulty level. As a film tie in the game had obviously been rushed and so levels were pretty sparse of enemies, and rather straightforward. I think I even remember finishing the last level and not even realising I’d cleared the game until the credits came up.