Tag Archives: Sunderland

Steelwork Steps for Former Brewery

The first steelwork has been laid in place as part of an exciting new Sunderland development. A plot of land, on the site of the former Faux Brewery, has begun construction on what will be a 60,000sq ft office complex – the land purchased by Sunderland City Council in 2011.

Irene Lucas CBE, chief executive of Sunderland City Council, said: Sunderland has taken huge leaps forward in attracting innovative, high-growth businesses to the city, as well as supporting start-ups to succeed – particularly in the knowledge economy, an area in which Sunderland has achieved the second fastest rate of growth outside London. 

“Office spaces like the new facility in Vaux will provide high quality accommodation to scores of businesses that want to be part of what will be an innovative and creative community at the heart of the city centre.  It’s hugely exciting to see the site taking shape.”

Work is being carried out by Carillion, part of the Siglion joint venture between Igloo Reconstruction and the Council to develop and transform five key sites across the city. Siglion itself is a development and regeneration company which found in April 2015. It manages over 700 tenancies and plans to develop Sunderland City at the Vaux site, Seaburn and Chapelgarth then Farringdon Row and Numbers Garth.

John Seager, chief executive of Siglion, said: “The Vaux site is such a focal point for Sunderland and its position as one of the main entrance points of the city centre is hugely important for those visiting.

“It’s fantastic to see the building begin to take shape and see this important location transformed into a development that reflects the modern and dynamic city that Sunderland is. The Vaux development, when it is completed, will be a space that will create new jobs, workplaces and original communities.  It’s a huge step forward and we hope that the second phase will follow soon after the first building.”

Designed by Architects Field Clegg Bradley Studios it is expected to stand five stories high, giving much needed office space to clients, as well as an open plan area accommodating a bar, café and restaurant with views overlooking River Wear and Wearmouth Bridge. It is expected that this site will be a flagship space in Sunderland’s current rejuvenation. The building is due to be completed in June 2018.

Eddie Tribe, Carillion’s project director said: “It’s great to start work on this iconic site. Our work will create jobs and opportunities for local businesses. We have agreed a target to achieve 60 per cent of spend with local suppliers and aim to employ 16 apprentices throughout the construction programme, with further opportunities within our supply chain for employment for local people.

Top 10 Quick Tips for Voting

Top 10 Quick Tips for Voting – Sunderland One
Wayne Madden

Prime Minister Teresa May’s decision to call a snap General Election in April 2017 wasn’t entirely unusual, in fact, the last snap election occurred in 1974 and saw no less than two general elections in just six months. But as the law has changed since then, the Prime Minister’s recent action couldn’t have succeeded without parliamentary support, the following day’s resolution of 522 MPs to 13 in favor of the election meant a majority decision had been made.

Hot on the heels of General Election 2015, and a difficult “second album” in the form of EU Referendum 2016, 2017 will be the second major elections (after May’s local elections) held post Brexit in the United Kingdom.

For Sunderland, many will be looking at January’s result in the Sandhill by-election, when Liberal Democrat Stephen O Brien was elected to office with a swing majority that took the “safe” Labour seat as a potential sign of change to come. That Labour seat being vacated due to its incumbents’ failure to attend council meetings.

For many people voting in Sunderland this may be their first election in the region, general or otherwise, as each year we welcome newly eligible voters to the electoral roll, as well as those who’ve not exercised the right before and those thousands of students who join us from around the country for their University experience.

It is a common misconception that by virtue of your decision to live in the region, enroll at Sunderland University or the fact that you have grown up here that you are eligible to vote at all. Eligibility to vote in a general election is confirmed through the Electoral Register. You can register for free, and even register online, though there will be a deadline before the Election and criteria which you’ll have to meet.

To help you make an impartial, informed and correct decision, we’ve put together a list of the Top 10 Quick Tips for Voting ahead of General Election 2017:

1. Before the big day itself, make sure you’re actually eligible to vote. You must be registered to vote, be over 18 on the day of the election (“polling day”), and be a British, Commonwealth or Irish citizen. You must also be resident at an address in the UK (or be a British citizen living abroad who has been registered to vote in the last 15 years). You cannot vote in a general election if you do not meet these criteria, even if you are able to vote in a local election or referendum.

2. You cannot vote at just any polling station, and will be assigned a polling station based on the “district” in which you live. Information will be provided through the Polling Card you receive in the mail in the weeks prior to the election. Keep this safe for reference. If you do not get one, contact Sunderland Council’s Electoral Services to ask why.

3. You cannot vote more than once in a single General Election. Doing so is a criminal offence. If you discover you are eligible to vote at a University residence, for example, as well as your home address; you should only vote from one of these places. You should also ensure you do not ask anyone to vote on your behalf or assume your identity to vote at an alternative location, even with good reason, as this is also illegal.

4. Anyone else in your place of residence will be voting at the same station as you – if you’re going to be away from home on June eighth then making sure you register for a postal vote is essential as this means you will receive a ballot paper a few days before the election that you can send from any postbox in the United Kingdom.

You can also drop your sealed postal vote envelope and completed ballot into any Polling Station within your Council’s remit on polling day. So, for example, if you live in South Shields (South Tyneside) you cannot drop your postal vote into a polling station at St Peter’s (Sunderland City).

5. Under certain conditions, you may be called upon to act as a proxy for another voter, or ask someone to vote for you as your proxy. You will have to register in advance to do this with your local Council and your request will not always be granted.

6. The Polling Station is open between 7am and 10pm. This is a legal requirement of the vote and gives people as much potential as possible to reach their station on polling day and cast their vote. You must ensure you have entered a polling station and received your ballot paper before the clock strikes 10pm.

7. Regardless of temptation, do not take a “voter selfie” while casting your vote, as this is both an obstruction to fellow voters and also illegal. In fact, this practice can cause expulsion from the polling station and a criminal report, so avoid the opportunity to post your favorite voting face to social media or send privately to friends.

8. Remember the Polling Card? Don’t worry if you’ve forgotten, even at the polling station, as it is not needed to vote. You’ll be asked to give your name and address to confirm your identity and then issued with a ballot paper. In the event that someone else has voted in your place (known as voter fraud) you’ll be asked a list of prescribed questions and at the discretion of the Presiding Officer will be issued a ballot. Hopefully, this will never happen.

9. Dressing up as Donald Trump or wearing a T Shirt condemning the sitting Government might seem like the right behavior that morning, but such political material is banned from the polling station (albeit it International or not), this going for more obvious things like literature distributed by candidates, Rosetta’s and obvious political color coordination which may all be interpreted as signs to sway fellow voters in their decisions. Likewise you can only cast a vote for a candidate running in your constituency and your approval for another member of a party running will not be counted as a vote.

10. Having successfully followed instruction and cast your vote carefully fold your ballot paper and place it in the ballot box as instructed by station staff. You do not need to show your completed ballot paper to station staff and they will not always high five you once this has happened, but you can definitely feel a sense of pride as you leave the station having cast your electoral voice.

Whomever you choose to vote for and however you wish to cast your electoral voice this General Election, prepare to exercise your right with information and impartiality. For everything positive and impartial about Sunderland, make sure you’re picking up Sunderland One.

Sunderland Shorts’ Film Festival 2017

Sunderland Short Film Festival 2017 – Sunderland One
Wayne Madden

Lights, Camera, Action.

Filmmakers and fans were elated in equal measure recently at the return of the popular Sunderland Short Film Festival earlier this month. The event, in its third year, was created in collaboration with ‘sister festival’ DC Shorts in America and provides a platform for filmmakers and enthusiasts to showcase their work on a national stage.

Creating a festival which celebrates the uniqueness and storytelling of short film, only films less than twenty minutes in length can be submitted for consideration, with screenings taking place over three days and each featuring a variety of shortlisted competitors.

Carys Watford, whose film ‘Theatreland’ screened at this year’s festival, spoke about the importance of an event like Sunderland Shorts, saying: “it’s always great to get your film seen in as many places as you can…if you can go to the festival which is screening it, all the better”. Bernie Mooney, whose seven minute drama ‘Thief’ tackles the topic of sex trafficking in the United Kingdom, was quick to add that “I’ve been at festivals before where nobody has turned up at all to watch your film…so to be here in Sunderland with a full audience like this is very gratifying”

As well as jury and audience based awards; films were nominated for several categories’ with a selection of the finalists films due to be shown to attendees in Washington at the DC Shorts festival this September. This offers locally based filmmakers the opportunity to have their work seen by an international audience and the offer is reciprocated when DC Shorts shortlist was screened on the last day of the festival in Sunderland. Finalists also received a free upload for their film courtesy of Modyst UK, an international digital platform and online cinema.

In 2006 Sunderland became the first and so far only city to sign a Friendship Agreement with Washington DC. This occasion was paramount to the establishment of Sunderland Shorts, as festival director Anne Tye explained. “Sunderland’s friendship status with Washington DC has brought about some real successes, and Sunderland Shorts Film Festival is chief among them.” adding further, “Learning from our friends in the US, and gleaning the knowledge they have gained over several years – growing their event from a standing start to one that is hugely popular and a key part of the city’s cultural programme – has allowed us to replicate this and quickly create a fantastic festival for Sunderland.”

In previous years, screenings occurred at various ‘pop up’ locations across the city, with each screening providing audiences a unique insight into both the artists work as well as a local venue they may never have visited. This year all screenings were localized centrally in ‘The Place’, a creative business hub in the city centre. Hannah Matterson, festival organizer, said: “Since the start of the festival in 2015, Sunderland Shorts has always had the aim of supporting local, small and medium sized businesses across the city.”

“We’ve been known to use coffee shops, art galleries and even boardrooms as cinemas in the past. By doing this we hope to encourage more young filmmakers to take up the art and to become the directors, cinematographers and producers of the future.”

As well as film screenings the event also presented several free workshops, delivered by established professionals in the industry, imparting advice and wisdom. Roar Motion’s Rob Parsons, who operated an informal showcase with business partner Matt Eyre told us: “It’s very important these workshops happen, when I was a student at University I would have loved to do something like this, get hands on with the technology in this way and see it all up close and in person, it’s invaluable”.

Councilor John Kelly, Sunderland City Council’s portfolio holder for public health, wellness and culture, said: “Sunderland is a very warm and friendly city and I’m certain this army of filmmakers, writers and actors will be afforded a fine Wearside welcome. Sunderland Shorts is helping put our city on the filmmaking map, and not only bringing exciting new talent in, but helping our city’s creative bight sparks showcase their own work to a whole new audience.”

Personal screen highlights included ‘Pebbles’, a drama from Jonathan Shaw which saw a woman return to the hotel where she spent her honeymoon fifty years hence. ‘Four Day Weekend’ was a superbly acted American drama about a married couple on a self imposed relationship break, animation ‘The Slow Lane’ was an incredible undertaking in both creation and design, a simple film about a tiny village and the damage of a fallen tree and the surreal ‘Dots’ was less than 91 seconds long, but also provided a unique interpretation into the genre of dance from filmmakers Jody Oberfelder and Eric Siegel.

As in previous years, winning films were announced on the last night of the festival, with Irish drama ‘Pebbles’ capturing both Best International picture and a Jury’s Choice award. Best North East regional film went to ‘Mordecai’, a truly original comedy drama from Benjamin Lee about two brothers at their father’s funeral, made with the permission and involvement of an orthodox Jewish community in Gateshead. There was also an audience choice award for James Cookson’s horror, ‘Panic’ while Best UK National film went to the picture that had proceeded it in that screening, comedy ‘Rhonna and Donna’ from director Diana O Pusic about two women conjoined at the hip.

“You make the film you feel passionate about” Carys’ told us, and this mantra can easily be transferred to the positive work Sunderland Shorts are doing making a festival in an area they truly feel passionate about.

“Each year, it is growing, and as we move into our third year, we look forward to creating something that is bigger and better than ever” Anne told me of this year’s event, “establishing a reputation of being ‘the friendliest festival’” making it obvious the team has no plans to slow down. “Short films aren’t an easy sell” Hannah confided, reflecting on the festival overall, “but we’re making steps forward each year to increase our audiences and to engage with more filmmakers from all over the world.”

With such a unique platform and a plethora of talent signing up, there’s no reason to imagine we’ll see the end of Sunderland Shorts anytime soon.

Stained Glass Window At St Peter’s

Stained Glass Window – St Peter’s – Sunderland One
Wayne Madden

A new stained glass window display in Sunderland has brought a vital piece of history back to the banks of the Wear River. Monasteries in both Monkwearmouth and Jarrow are credited as having brought stained glass to England in 674AD, with a new instillation now unveiled some 1,300 years later at Bede’s Bakehouse cafe, St Peter’s.

The Bakehouse Café is so called because Saint Bede, an English monk from the monastery at St Peter who has been called “The Father of English History”, wrote of a similarly named “bakehouse” on the site. Volunteers at the café attempt to emulate the welcoming and positive hospitality Bede experienced to this day.

The display, created by artists Rachel Welford and Adrian Riley, was inspired by ‘The Reckoning of Time’ – arguably Bede’s greatest scientific achievement. Written in 725AD the book calculated a 1253 year cynical calendar, a forerunner to the western calendar we still use today.

Artist Rachel Welford explained that Bede’s observations of day and night were crucially important in the design of the work, saying: “Just as Bede observed the changes from day to night, the windows change with the light, revealing variations in pattern, shadow, reflection and colour at different times of the day and year and in varying weather conditions” and that “Unlike most traditional stained glass they are also intended to be viewed from the exterior of the building as well as inside.”

Rachel says further that “We wanted to make a work that didn’t just illustrate facts, or is a representation of an event; rather it is an example of that event itself. It embodied those concepts rather than just showing a picture”

The stained glass was created at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland. A representative of the centre spoke to Sunderland One about the process of creating such a display saying: “this process would be what’s known as a muff method for making stained glass sheets” and that “it includes hundreds of colours’ in beautiful single color sheets”

Rachel spoke to Sunderland One exclusively about the creation process further, saying: “The type of glass that we used is called Spectrum 96, it’s a fusible glass. Normal glass can’t be mixed, the monastery used innovative techniques at the time so we wanted to use cutting edge technology, using modern techniques. Once we got the designs approved I bought in spectrum stained glass, fusible glass, I then started working with that to create the panels”.

“The mirror layer was one separate layer and then there was another layer of fused glass. I used water jet cutting, it’s a digital process, and it cuts anything abrasively at high pressure with garnet. You’re very limited with the shapes you can do with traditional glass so the use of the water jet meant I could cut different shapes from a number of colored pieces that would be used together on a single layer”

“There are 12 windows, each window had six squares, all in all I had 72 unique panels to make. The mirror layer created the most difficulty; I got an external company to create that for me. It’s took me a year to do this, just over, but it was probably another year when considering the design and authorization processes”

Sunderland City Council worked in collaboration with the local Parish of Saint Peter’s and the Diocesan Advisory Committee of Durham to help realize the fruition of the project. Team Rector of Monkwearmouth Parish, Reverend Dick Bradshaw praised the results, saying: “It has been fantastic to have been involved from start to finish with this visionary artwork reflecting the life and work of Bede”.

“The new stained glass windows are a fantastic addition to the Bakehouse at St Peter’s, where so many visitors come to relax, enjoy their surroundings and learn more about our shared cultural heritage.”

Sunderland City Council’s Cabinet Secretary Councilor Mel Speding, who was present at the unveiling of the new stained glass windows in April, said: “St Peter’s is an important site for our city, our region and for the country so I’m delighted that it continues to capture the imagination of people of this city.”

Reflecting on the project since its completion, Rachel – who is currently doing her PHD at Sunderland University – often visits the café for lunch with friends and colleagues to observe her work. “The church wardens there have said it really enhances the bakehouse and the experience of people visiting” she says, “it’s a different experience for me each time because of the type of glass and changing weather, there’s always an element of surprise. It’s really lovely to see. It’s doing what I hoped it would”

The Bakehouse Café is currently open Monday, Wednesday and Friday between 10.30am and 2.30pm and for best results the windows can be easily viewed from both inside the grounds of the church as well as from inside the café.

Wonderlands Expo 2017

Wonderlands Expo 2017 – Sunderland One
Wayne Madden

Fans of graphic novels were in their element recently with the return of the ever popular ‘Wonderlands’ Expo to Sunderland. Now in its third year, this free celebratory event was held at City Space, Sunderland University, and paid tribute to the comic in all its forms, with a wide variety of workshops, panels, stalls and talks.

Ordinarily home to the Sunderland City Predators, a converted basketball court was the stage for a variety of stalls, featuring work from a plethora of talented national creators and designers. Artists like Track 11 Design, Drew X and Castle Rock’s Bob Turner were on hand to provide caricatures and commissions as well as examples of their latest work. Others, such as Alan Henderson’s The Penned Guin, provided a humorous example of parody and design with selections from previously established catalogues.

Guests of honor gave talks throughout the day, with a particular fan favorite being Liverpool born John Higgins, colorist on Watchmen; the seminal series from DC Comics written by Alan Moore and later a major motion picture directed by Zack Snyder. “We can’t believe how friendly people are” John said, “The Northern friendship is just magic. I think the thing I enjoy most about it is that you get to meet the fans. 90% of the time we spend at home is in a darkened room drawing, so to actually get out and meet fans is just so important and the fact that the University is presenting it in such a considered way we can give a bit back about how we created the characters and share that knowledge is fantastic”.

The events strong foot fall was just one indicator of its popularity and continued success. Organizer Hannah Matterson, Events and Development Coordinator for MAC Trust, said: “We’re thrilled that Wonderlands [is] back for a third year. We’ve worked hard to make sure the event stays free and we’ve been awarded money from Arts Council England to help support the event.”

Providing an introduction for younger people, ‘The Wonderlands Anthology’ was a brand new comic book available for free – a collaboration between pupils at Farrington Community Academy and St Aidan’s Catholic Academy in Sunderland – where students contributed their own short strips for inclusion and then collected their published work at the event. It was another reminder that Wonderlands catered for all ages and exposures.

Beano illustrator Nigel Auchterlounie travelled from Whitley Bay, on hand to make a rare public appearance at Wonderlands showcasing works like ‘Bunny Girl and Pig Boy’ and leading an informal design workshop. “It’s great here, I’ve never been before” he remarked, “I think events like these are important in widening culture, showing another medium, there are so many other ways to tell a story than television – like in comic books”.

Other attendees to the convention used comics in more serious, yet still entertaining light. Comics vs. Cancer are an innovative forum in which Scottish writer Gordon Robertson used the medium to talk about taking a stand against cancer. “I was diagnosed with cancer” said Gordon, “I wanted to write a blog about it. But there’s so many great cancer blogs out there, things that are heart rendering.

I didn’t have that bad of an experience [with cancer] so I felt I couldn’t do that…I created a comic called ‘Arse Cancer’ and that’s where it went. I taught we could use it to raise money for charity. I had bowel cancer, my first wife died from breast cancer and my current wife has also had breast cancer. Humor is a great way of getting things across we wouldn’t normally discuss, so if it helps people recognize symptoms it could save lives and make a real difference.”

Wonderlands ended on a high, being a positive event for Sunderland, encouraging people to expand their minds, get to know a little bit more about graphic novels and share similar interests. A resounding success for the region.